Walling In and Walling Out: Why Are We Building New Barriers to Divide Us?

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Laura McAtackney, Randall H. McGuire
University of New Mexico Press, Apr 15, 2020 - Political Science - 272 pages

Walls are being built at a dizzying pace to separate us, cocoon us, and exclude us. The contributors to this volume illuminate the roles and uses of walls around the world--in contexts ranging from historic neighborhoods to contemporary national borders. They argue that more and more walls are being built even though they are a paradox in a neoliberal world in which people, goods, and ideas are supposed to move freely. The walls examined in this volume do not share a common form or type, but they do share a common political purpose: they determine and defend racist definitions of social belonging by controlling access and movement. The contributors include archaeologists, anthropologists, geographers, and sociologists. They bring different perspectives and insights to the scale, form, and impact of this phenomenon of "walling in" and "walling out."

 

Contents

List of Illustrations
1
A History of Walls
25
InVisible Codes of Neighborhood
47
Chapter FOur Segregation Walls and Public Memory in Contemporary
63
3
80
Israels Racist
85
1
91
The Cold
111
2
138
4
144
Chapter eight Whose Borderland? What Evidence? Divergent Interests
155
3
163
Reticulating
179
Chapter ten The Material and Symbolic Power of Border Walls
195
The Repercussions of Walls
211
References
221

1
114
2
122
Invisible Walls and Rebordering
131
Contributors
249
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About the author (2020)

Laura McAtackney is an associate professor in the Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies at Aarhus University in Denmark. She explores the historical and contemporary archaeologies of institutions and colonialism (often together) and the material world of post-conflict Northern Ireland. Randall H. McGuire is a SUNY Distinguished Professor at Binghamton University in Binghamton, New York. His research focuses on the anthropology and archaeology of the Sonoran Desert in Arizona, the Mexican state of Sonora, and the border that divides these two states.

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